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Fishing Reports

August 21, 2014

 


08-21-2014

Anglers report good fishing for browns and rainbows. Hatches are common, so both dry flies and top/bottom combinations are working well. Try a combination with a mayfly, cicada or grasshopper on top followed by an emerger, scud, midge larva or egg imitation as a trailer. Other hatches are also starting, so be prepared to switch techniques if a hatch begins in your area. Anglers using lures have also been successful. Try using crankbaits, spinners, spoons and jigs in fish, crayfish, black, white, silver or gold colors.

 Check the following link for an updated daily measurement:  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?09234500

 

Dry Flies:

Nymphs: 

Streamers:

Dry Fly Patterns:

Nymph Patters:

Streamers: 

Spin fishing:

 

 

 

Report brought to you by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources by Ron Stewart, Northeastern Region Conservation Outreach Manager

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

Kokanee salmon: Fishing is fair to good. Schools of fish are moving deeper (40 to 65 feet) and are picky about lures. Try starting out with silver-colored flashers and pink and orange lures. Keep mixing it up until you find the right combination. If the schools are deep, try jigging with a small jigging spoon or trolling by just above the school.

Rainbow trout: Most anglers report good fishing. Spoons, jigs, crankbaits and common trout baits (like worms) work well from the shore or a boat. We've received reports of small schools cruising the shoreline. Fishing is good off rocky points and inlets, and in the backs of some of the bays. Anglers are also catching rainbows while fishing for lake trout, kokanee and bass.

Lake trout: Fishing is fair to good. You can find schools, small groups and single fish anywhere, but anglers are mostly catching them in deeper waters. If you mark a group, try holding position and then drop a vertical presentation, like a jigging spoon (chartreuse) or three-inch tube jig (white). Tip your lure with a small chunk of sucker meat and vary jigging activity until you learn the fish's behavior. You may also want to try trolling through or just above the school, at depths around 45 to 75 feet. Try different crankbaits or brightly colored spoons. Deep trolling right on the bottom with small, white crankbaits or flatfish is also working well. Please keep your limit of small, tasty lake trout. It reduces competition among species and helps both the lake trout and kokanee fisheries.

Smallmouth bass: Fishing is good to excellent for the smaller fish in the surface waters and larger fish below. Just about any kind of bass lure is working well — including flies, grubs, wacky worms, crankbaits, spoons and toppers.

Burbot: Anglers report fair to good fishing starting just before midnight in 50 to 75 feet of water and moving shallower. Burbot will hit during the day, generally in the deeper waters (around 75 feet). They become more active, however, during the evening and twilight hours when they move into the shallows to forage. Try fishing for a few hours, starting around sunset, along the rocky points, cliffs and the old channels. You'll want to fish the bottom or just slightly above it. You should use just about anything that glows (spoons, tube jigs, curly-tailed jigs, minnow, jigging spoons) and tip our lure with some type of bait. (Cut bait, like sucker meat, is recommended.) Worms with a marshmallow placed about 6 to 12 inches above the weight have worked recently. Place your lure or bait within inches of the bottom and recharge the glow frequently. It is common to catch a fish immediately after recharging and dropping a lure. You'll help the Flaming Gorge fishery (including kokanee) by harvesting as many burbot as possible. There is no limit on burbot.

Report Information Courtesy of the Division of Wildlife Resource

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

BROWNE LAKE:  Good

Fishing is fair to good. Because of the lower water levels and weeds along the shore, it's difficult to fish from the bank. Browne was being drained so that crews could work on the dam, however it will not have to be drained completely as they were able to inspect the problem areas. Because of the problem with the dam, the daily bag and possession limit has been upgraded from four to eight trout until Jan. 1, 2015.

CALDER RESERVOIR:  Slow

Anglers report slow fishing from tubes and slow fishing from the bank. Biologists have reported an increase in the number of dead fish observed along the shoreline. This is likely a product of the water being warmer than usual, which adds stress to the fish are being released. To reduce stress on fish, use stronger line, bring fish in quickly, keep their gills in water at all times, and use wet hands and rubber or silicon nets to prevent damage to their scales and the protective slim layer. Please park in the parking area and not on the ramp (inside the cattle guard). This will help others launch more quickly. Calder has catch-and-release regulations. You must use flies and lures only: bait is not allowed.   See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.

CROUSE RESERVOIR:  Slow

The water level is extremely low, and what's left is being pumped downstream to meet the water rights of downstream users to meet the water rights of downstream users.

EAST PARK RESERVOIR:  Good

Fishing is fair to good using flies and spoons, but slower using bait. The water level is now below the ramp, which will make it difficult to launch a boat from a trailer. The Uintas have been getting scattered afternoon showers.

LONG PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

Anglers report fair to good fishing using small lures and baits near the inlet and boat ramp.

MATT WARNER:  Fair

Anglers report slow to good fishing, depending on the depth they are fishing, the time of day and their ability to stay out of the weeds in the inlet arm. The blue green algae is making it harder to use lures. The best fishing is in the cool morning and evening hours. The water level is low, so launching a boat could be difficult.

MOOSE POND:  Fair

Anglers report fair to good fishing. Moose Pond is stocked with catchable-sized rainbows

SHEEP CREEK LAKE:  Slow

Anglers report slow to fair fishing, but nothing consistent.

SPIRIT LAKE:  Fair

Anglers report fair fishing for stocked fish. Spirit has been restocked with catchable-sized tiger trout, so try using small, brightly colored lures. Tamarak and Jessen are also being stocked with tiger trout. Two to three inch fingerlings will be flown into these upper lakes. They should grow to catchable sizes in two to three years. For those interested in starting from the Spirit Lake trailheads, anglers report fair to good fishing on the other lakes in this area. Last September, Spirit, Tamarak, Jessen and several other small lakes and their connecting streams in the headwaters of the Middle Fork of Sheep Creek were treated. All fish species were removed as part of a Colorado River cutthroat trout restoration project. This treatment is a critical part of a management strategy to keep Colorado River cutthroat trout off the endangered species list.

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