Skip to Primary Navigation Skip to Primary Content

Fishing Reports

November 13, 2014

 


11-13-2014

 

Anglers report good fishing for browns and rainbows. Both dry flies and top/bottom combinations are working well. Try a combination with a grasshopper or large terrestrial on top, followed by an emerger, scud, midge larva or egg imitation as a trailer. Also, be prepared to switch techniques if a hatch begins in your area. Lures are also working well. Try crankbaits, spinners, spoons and jigs in fish, crayfish, black, white, silver and gold colors.

 

 Check the following link for an updated daily measurement:  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?09234500

 

Dry Flies:

Nymphs: 

Streamers:

Dry Fly Patterns:

Nymph Patters:

Streamers: 

Spin fishing:

 

 

 

Report brought to you by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources by Ron Stewart, Northeastern Region Conservation Outreach Manager

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

Kokanee salmon: Closed — All kokanee caught from September 10 through November 30 must be immediately released. Sheep Creek, a tributary stream near Manila, is also closed to fishing.

Rainbow trout: Most anglers report good fishing. Spoons, jigs and crankbaits along with common trout baits (such as worms) are working from the shore and from boats. We've received reports of small schools cruising the shoreline. Anglers also report good fishing off rocky points, inlets and in the backs of some of the bays.

Lake trout: Anglers report good to excellent fishing.  Schools, small groups and singles can be anywhere, although most are now being taken in deeper water. If you find a group, try holding your position and drop a vertical presentation such as a jigging spoon (chartreuse) or a three-inch tube jig (white). Tip your lure with a small chunk of sucker meat and vary jigging activity until you learn the fish's behavior. Also, try trolling through or just above the school, usually around 45 to 75 feet deep. Try different crankbaits or brightly colored spoons. Deep trolling right on the bottom with small, white crankbaits or flatfish is also working well, especially if you're going after big fish. Keep your limit of small, tasty lake trout to reduce competition and help both the lake trout and kokanee fisheries.  Note: Linwood Bay - west of a line from the easternmost point of the south shore of Linwood Bay (the mouth of canyon) to easternmost point of the north shore of Linwood Bay (Lucerne Point) - is closed to nighttime angling, from sunset to sunrise, from Oct. 15 until 6 a.m. on Dec. 13. 

Smallmouth bass:  Fishing is slow.  The bass are slowing down and going deeper.  You may find smaller fish 20 feet down and larger fish are even deeper.  Try using darker, crayfish-colors bass lures in just about any type, including flies, grubs, worms, crankbaits and spoons.  If they are not hitting, try going smaller and working your lure down close to the bottom. 

Burbot: Fishing is starting to pick up.  Choose the spots you want to fish in the late afternoon, before it gets dark.  Start in 50 to 75 feet of water and move shallowers after sunset and as the night progresses.  Burbot will hit during the day, generally in deep water (around 75 feet down), but they become more active during the twilight and evening hours when they move into shallower waters (approximately 20 feet down) to forage.  Some fish will follow channels and come into waters less then 10 feet deep.  Try fishing for a few hours, starting around sunset, along the rocky points, cliffs and the old channels.  Fish the bottom or just slightly above it.  Use just about anything that glows (including sppons, tube jigs, curly-tailed jigs, minnows or jigging spoons) and tip your lure with some type of bait.  (Cut bait, like sucker meat, is recommended.) Another good option is to use a worm with a marshmallow placed about 6 to 10 inches above the weight.  Place your lure or bait within inches of the bottom and recharge the glow frequently.  It is common to catch a fish immediately after re-glowing and dropping a lure.  You'll help the Flaming Gorge fishery by  harvesting as many burbot as possible.  There is no limit on burbot.  

Report Information Courtesy of the Division of Wildlife Resource

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

BROWNE LAKE:  Fair

The fishing has been slow to fair. Water levels are low, and weeds are growing along the shoreline, which makes it harder to bank fish. Browne was being drained for work on the dam. Crews were able to inspect the problem areas, however, and the reservoir was not drained completely. Because of the problem with the dam, the daily bag limit has been increased to eight trout until Jan. 1, 2015.

CALDER RESERVOIR:  Fair

Anglers report fair fishing from tubes and from the bank. Please help limit catch-and-release mortality by using stronger lines, bringing fish in quickly, keeping their gills in the water at all times and making sure your hands are wet before you handle any fish. Using rubber or silicon nets will also prevent damage to scales and the fish's protective slime layer. Please park in the parking area and not on the ramp (inside the cattle guard); it will help others launch with fewer delays. Calder has catch-and-release regulations. You must use flies and lures only — bait is not allowed.  See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.

CROUSE RESERVOIR:  Closed

Water levels are extremely low. Most of the remaining water has been pumped out to meet the water rights of downstream users.

EAST PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

Fishing has been fair with flies and spoons. It's been a bit slower with baits, although some anglers have done well drifting worms. The water level is well below the ramp, which makes it difficult to launch a boat from a trailer. The Uintas have been getting some heavy rains.

LONG PARK RESERVOIR:  Good

Anglers report good fishing using small lures and baits near the inlet and boat ramp.  Even though the water is low, you can still launch a small boat.

MATT WARNER:  Good

Anglers report fair to good fishing. The best fishing reported this week was mid-morning and in the late afternoon or early evening hours. The water level is low (below the boat ramp), so launching boats can be difficult.

MOOSE POND:  Fair

Anglers report fair to good fishing. The pond has been stocked with catchable-sized rainbows.

SHEEP CREEK LAKE:  Slow

Anglers report slow to fair fishing.

SPIRIT LAKE:  Fair

Anglers report fair fishing for stocked fish.  Spirit has been stocked with catchable-sized tiger trout, so try small, brightly colored lures.  Tamarak and Jessen are also being stocked with tiger trout.  Two- to three-inch fingerlings were flown into these upper lakes, and they will take two or three years to reach catchable sizes.  This high elevation area is receiving snow, so you may not be able to easily access the snake. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE FLY SHOP!
(435) 889-3773 ext. 2

NOW ORDER YOUR FLIES ONLINE!
 

1100 E Flaming Gorge Resort, Dutch John, UT 84023 | 435-889-3773 | info@flaminggorgeresort.com