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Fishing Reports

June 26, 2015

 

 

06-26-2015
 

Report and Pictures by Flaming Gorge Resorts Fishing Guide
David Schnieder


 

General Rating:  GOOD

General conditions: Caddis, yellow sallies, PMD's and terrestrials are becoming fish food daily.  The river is seeing a big increase in traffic both floating and wade fishing.  The flows starting at midnight will release 1,000 cfs and will gradually increase to about 1800 cfs by 5 a.m.  Then at 5 p.m. it will increase to 2350 cfs until midnight.  Red Creek is still muddy but should clear in a day or two. Check the link below for an updated daily measurment:

Check the following BOR link for an updated daily measurement: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?09234500

General Info: Fish and bugs are very active making for good fishing.

Hatches:  BWO's, midges, ants, and crickets

Dry Flies:  GOOD

The fish are being very picky when it comes to eating dry flies.  Long and drag free drifts are very important.  Cicadas, ants, and crickets have been producting fish.  I have tapered dwon to 4x on my leaders and tippet hoping to hide it a little better.  Caddis, Yellow Sallies, PMD's, Ants, crickets and midges (clusters).

Dry Fly Patterns: Gren River Para Cricket, Carls Cicada, M's Hopper, Sailor Ant, Tan or black PMX, Beetles, Hamburgler, Chernobyl ants, Cicada's.

Nymphs/Emergers:   GOOD

Nymphing will bring some of the more stubborn trout up from the deeper waters.  The whole river seemed to fish consisten today.  When we could get a good drift over feeing fish we would hoop up usually multiple times in a run.  I have been 9 feet to the first fly deep and adjust weight if the fish are higher or lower in the column.  Aquatic worms, scuds, midges and mayflies, yellpw sally nymph's and random moss/sticks are in these fish stomachs.  A caddis trailed by a PMD nymph were the most consistent for our boat.

Nymph Patterns: Scuds, San Juan worms, Juju beatis/Jujube midge, Pheasant tail, Zebra midge, Rs-2, Gray soft hackle, Egan's Frenchie, Black Beauty, Ginger bugger, Split case PMD's, Turkey biot midges, iron sally.

Streamers:  FAIR

On sunny days I am throwing bright color and cloudy days dark colors.  I have been throwing a ginger bugger or a tan bugger since the weather has been sunny and clear  Black or olive are my next choices.  With the higher flows a sinking line or sinking leader will help keep your fly in the "strike zone" just a little longer.

Streamers: Galloups Dragon black, tan and olive, Barely Legal, Sculpzilla natural and olive colors, Ginger bugger, Dali Llama, Rainbow trout fly, Space invador olive and black, Raghead sculpin, sleech.

Spin Fishing:  GOOD

Zig Jigs in black, tan and, olive. Rapala, fly and bubble, kast master, spinners

 Fishing with spin gear is always productive using Zig Jigs in black, tan and, olive. Brown Trout Rapalas are a good choice as well. Throwing a clear bubble with a Cicada a few feet away has also been working. Just remember if your using a trebble hook or if your lure has multiple trebble hooks its easier to release the fish and doesn’t harm them as much if you pinch the barbs down.

Other Information: 

With the sun finally peeking out sunscreen and water are a necessity.  We have raft rentals and shuttles available to make your day a little easier.  Rods, reels, waders, boots and nets can be rented in the fly shop.  There is a lot of new gear in and osme great prices. Our fly shop hours are 6:30 A.M to 10:00 P.M please stop by or give us a call at 435-889-3773 Ext. 2. Tight lines!

DAVID'S WEEKLY PHOTOS

 

Report brought to you by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
by Ron Stewart, Northeastern Region Conservation Outreach Manager

 

Utah and Wyoming ramps got some snow, but they are ice-free, so boats can be launched.  Reservior levels have held up well and they are even letting some water out in preparation for sping thaws in the upper Green River drainage.

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

Kokanee salmon: Kokanee fishing has been a highlight of this spring and the rainy weather only seems to improve angler success.  Kokanee in the canyon can reach up to 17 incres and two pounds.  Anglers are catching most fish in 10 feet of water or less, but watch the graph because kokannee will go deeper water when the sun is high and the water warms.  Try using a variety of lures, including Cripplures, Needlefish, RMT Viper spoons and dodgers with squids.  Pink or orange lures are always a good choice.  You may also want to try trolling at speeds of 1.6 to 2.2 mph.

Rainbow troout: Anglers report good to excellent fishing in Utah and in Wyoming.  Spoons, jigs and crankbaits (along with common trout baits, such as worms) are working from the shore and from boats.  We've heard reports of small schools cruising the shoreline and good fishing off rocky points, inlets and in the back of some of the bays.  Some anglers fishing deep for lake trout are cathing rainbow trout.

Lake trout: Anglers report good to excellent fishing, mostly from boats.  Fish can be anywhere, although more are still being taken in deeper waters.  If you mark a group, try holding position and drop a vertical presentation such as a jigging spoon (chartreuse) or 3-inch tube jig (white).  Tip your lure with a small chunk of sucker meat and vary jigging activity until you learn the fish's behavior.  Also try trolling through or just above the school, usually 45 to 75 feet deep.  Try different crankbaits or brightly-colored spoons.  Try different crankbaits or brightly colored spoons.  Slow, shallow trolls along sloping banks can be an excellent technique in the spring.  It's one of the few times of year that you can just troll without specialized deep-water equipment.  Deep trolling, right on the bottow, with small, white crankbaits or flatfish is also working well, especially if you're going after big fish.  Keep your limit of small, tasty lake trout to reduce competition and help both the lake trout and kokanee fisheries.

Smallmouth bass:  Anglers report slow fishing.  The bass have moved up a little higher in the water, but they are still in deeper waters waiting for the surface water to warm up.  Anglers have caught some bass fishing crankbaits and jigs down deep in about 20 feet of water.

Burbot: We haven't received many fishing reports, but you should be able to catch them from a boat or from the bank.  Pick your spots in the later afternoon, so you can see the area where you want to go when it gets dark.  Be sure to take lights to find your way back.  Boat anglers can start fishing before sunset in 50 to 75 feet of water.  Move shallower after sunset and as the night progresses.  Burbot will hit during the day, generally in deep water (around 75 feet down), but they become more active during the twilight and evening hours when they move into shallower waters (approximately 20 feet down) to forage.  Some fish will follow channels and come into waters less then 10 feet deep.  Try fishing along the rocky shores, points, cliffs and the old channels.  Fish the bottom or just slightly above it.  Use just about anything that glows (including sppons, tube jigs, curly-tailed jigs, minnows or jigging spoons) and tip your lure with some type of bait.  (Cut bait, like sucker meat, is recommended.) Another good option is to use a worm with a marshmallow placed about 6 to 10 inches above the weight.  Place your lure or bait within inches of the bottom and recharge the glow frequently.  It is common to catch a fish immediately after re-glowing and dropping a lure.  You'll help the Flaming Gorge fishery by  harvesting as many burbot as possible.  There is no limit on burbot.  

Report Information Courtesy of the Division of Wildlife Resource

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

BROWNE LAKE:  Fair

The last report was fair fishing.  The roads should be dry

CALDER RESERVOIR:  Fair

Anglers report fair to good fishing, and the water level remains low.  Calder has catch-and-release regulations. You must use flies and lures only; bait and scented or salted lures are not allowed. See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.

CROUSE RESERVOIR:  Slow

Water levels are extremely low.

EAST PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

Anglers report slow to good fishing.  It varies from day to day.  Try trout baits like worms or artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons and crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds where the fish will find it easier.  The reservoir is full and the roads are dry.

LONG PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

There haven't been any recent reports.  The roads should be drying out.

MATT WARNER:  Good

Most reports are of fair to good fishing.  Try trout baits (like worms) or artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons and crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm about the mud and weeds where the fish will find it easier.

MOOSE POND:  Good

Most anglers report good fishing.  The pond was recently stocked.  Try trout baits, like worms or artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons and crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds where the fish will find it easier.

SHEEP CREEK LAKE:  Fair

We receive the one report or fair fishing.  The raods in the area should be dry.

SPIRIT LAKE:  Good

A few early anglers reported fair to good fishing.  For trout, try baits like worms, mealworms, salmon eggs or artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons, crayfish-colored jigs and fish-colored crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use a marshmellow or floating bait to float your biat roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm above the mud and weeks where the fish will find it easier.  Spirit was restocked with catchable-sized tiger trout last summer.  Tamarak and Jessen were also stocked with tiger trout.  Two to three inch fingerlings were flown into these upper lakes, and they will take about two to three years to reach catchable sizes.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE FLY SHOP!
(435) 889-3773 ext. 2

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