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Fishing Reports

February 24, 2015

 

 

02-24-2015
 

Report and Pictures by Flaming Gorge Resorts Fishing Guide
David Schnieder


 

General Rating:  GOOD

Fishing Pressure:  MODERATE  With the warmer weather and lack of ice for ice fisherman, the Green is seeing an increase of anglers.  The fishing is really starting to get amazing!  We should continue to get better hatches so the bite is on!!!  Don't miss your chance to get out and enjoy the water.

Flow Info:  The river is currently doing a double peak flow.  The flow fluctuates between 3,000 cfs in the morning and 1200 cfs around noon.  The water temperature is between 40 and 41 degrees Fahrenheit.  The water will drop 2 feet around noon but will also come back up 2 feet around 6 p.m.  Starting March 1st the releases will decrease 10 CFS a day until reaching 2000 CFS.  I will keep this updated weekly until they are done chaning flows.  Just be sure not to get caught off balance when it is fluctuating. 

 Check the following BOR link for an updated daily measurement:  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?09234500

General Info:  The fish have been very active lately.  We have seen quite a few fish over 20 inches being caught.  Weather in the area has been very warm and most days are reaching to the low to mid 40's.  Red Creek was running a little bit on the B section but after it mixed with the rest of the river the clarity was just a bit off.  While fishing the last month or so I have noticed lots of trash including the dreaded powerbait bottles and worm cans.  Please remember the river is artificial flies and lures only.

Just a reminder we have our Winter Special on guide trips and lodging.  Guide trip price is $340 and 1 night of lodging is only $59.

Hatches:  We have been seeing midges and small BWO's hatching through the day.  The sunny warm days have given us some excellent midge hatches lasting a few hours.  Overcast days have given us good BWO hatches.  The bugs I have been seeing on the water are fairly small (size 20-24).  Sculpins and scuds are always in the river as well and the trout will feed on them year round.

Dry Flies:  GOOD

Griffiths gnat, para mating midge, green river split tail baetis, Morgan's midge, hackle stacker BWO, brook sprout.  The natural bugs have been size 20-24.  I just try and match the fly size to the naturals since it will vary every day.  Tapering down to 6x and having a long (10-12 ft) leader will help give your fly a better presentation.  I have been seeing some good pods of feeding fish in slack water and some shallow faster runs.  I have seen a mix of midges and B.W.O. on the water with occasional sedge flying around.  I dropped a small emerger off my midge pattern and did pretty well with that set up until I stuck my flies in a tree behind me...not the first and sure won't be the last time.

Nymphs/Emergers:   GOOD

Jig-a-glo, zebra midges black or brown, juju baetis, rs-2, pheasant tail, midge bomb, gray soft hackle, scuds, wd-40, Egans Frenchie, sparkle wings rs-2.

Nymphing with a tandem rig has been pretty productive.  Eggs are still a good attractor pattern followed by a small midge or BWO.  I fished a double zebra midge or a BWO with a zebra midge trailer when the fish were not on the surface.  Since the water is running fairly high I used 2 BB split shot to get down to the fish.  Keeping your flies in the "fishy" zone will better your chances of getting hook ups.

Streamers:  GOOD

Galloups Dungeon, chain reaction, space invader, party girl, rag head sculpin, wool head, sculpzilla (white, olive, black and ginger)

Streamer fishing is one of the funnest ways to catch fish in my opinion.  The takes are very aggressive and the battle after the take is even more aggressive.  This time of year a dead drift or slow strip retrieve is going to be the most effective.  Color can vary by the day.  On a sunny day, I choose a bright color like white and make changes depending on the fishes reactions.  Cloudy overcast days will honestly be your best bet for some good streamer fishing.  I usually start with a dark sculpin and make changes as the day progresses.  You will want to fish pretty tight to the bank and work your way out until you think you fished the water real hard.

Spin Fishing:  GOOD

Sping fishing is always productive.  Jigs and rapalas are most popular for spin fishing here.  The jig is supposed to imitate a wounded baitfish or sculpin.  Try different retreive speeds and how often you jig.  Rapalas will lure fish from just about anywhere.  Using floating rapalas will keep you from catching bottom every cast.  The treble hook can cause some major damage to the fish.  We suggest taking a treble hook or two off so that the fish don't get major damage done to them.  Some people will take the treble hooks off and use single hooks in their place.

Other Information:  The weather is pretty mild.  Remember to bring some warm clothes and extra clothes just in case of an accidental fall in the water. There is lots of ice after the water drops and I took a fall the other day so be cautious on slick spots.  Stop in the Flaming Gorge Resort Fly Shop on your way out for more information or just to talk fishing.  The shop has some super deals going on with 40-50% off select rods, reels, gloves, etc...We also love to hear your feedback at the end of your day!  Tight Lines and may the Fish be Biting!!!

DAVID'S WEEKLY PHOTOS

 

Report brought to you by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
by Ron Stewart, Northeastern Region Conservation Outreach Manager

 

Ice is moving up reservoir and the Forest Service has issued a non-motorized vehicle policy banning the use of vehicles on the ice.  It is only open to foot traffic right now.  Some anglers have been going out on ice as far south as Currant Creek and in Buckboard Bay, but the ice is deteriorating and the agencies recommend against getting on the ice in these southern areas.  Check the ice carefully because it has frozen and unfrozen in irregular patterns.  Thin ice can easily be one step away from good ice.  The Utah ramps are ice free, so you can launch a boat.

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

Kokanee salmon: Fishing reopened on November 30th, but there haven't been any recent reports from anglers. 

Rainbow troout: A few anglers have reported fair to good fishing in Utah and in Wyoming from a boat or through the ice.  Spoons, jigs, and crankbaits, along with commont trout baits such as worms, are working from the shore. through the ice or from a boat.  We've received reports of small schools cruising the shoreline and good fishing off rocky points, inlets and in the backs of some of the bays.  Anglers are catching rainbows in deep water when they're out fishing for lake trout. 

Lake trout: Anglers report good to excellent fishing in areas where there is safe ice or while fishing near the ice in boats.  Fish can be anywhere, although more are still being taken in deeper waters.  If you mark a group, try holding position and drop a vertical presentation such as a jigging spoon (chartreuse) or 3-inch tube jig (white).  Tip your lure with a small chunk of sucker meat and vary jigging activity until you learn the fish's behavior.  Also try trolling through or just above the school, usually 45 to 75 feet deep.  Try different crankbaits or brightly-colored spoons.  Deep trolling right on the bottom with small, white crankbaits or flatfish is also working well, especially for those going after big fish.  Keep your limit of small, tasty lake trout to reduce competition and help both the lake trout and kokanee fisheries.  Linwood Bay is now open. 

Smallmouth bass:  Fishing is slow.  The bass are deep and will stay there until the water warms up.

Burbot: Reports indicate fishing is fair to good from boats and slower up the northern arms.  Try picking a spot in late afternoon, so you can see your area and figure out where you want to go when it gets dark.  Be sure to take lights to find your way back.  Start fishing before sunset in 50 to 75 feet of water and move shallower as the night progresses.  Burbot will hit during the day, generally in deep water (around 75 feet down), but they become more active during the twilight and evening hours when they move into shallower waters (approximately 20 feet down) to forage.  Some fish will follow channels and come into waters less then 10 feet deep.  Try fishing along the rocky shores, points, cliffs and the old channels.  Fish the bottom or just slightly above it.  Use just about anything that glows (including sppons, tube jigs, curly-tailed jigs, minnows or jigging spoons) and tip your lure with some type of bait.  (Cut bait, like sucker meat, is recommended.) Another good option is to use a worm with a marshmallow placed about 6 to 10 inches above the weight.  Place your lure or bait within inches of the bottom and recharge the glow frequently.  It is common to catch a fish immediately after re-glowing and dropping a lure.  You'll help the Flaming Gorge fishery by  harvesting as many burbot as possible.  There is no limit on burbot.  

Report Information Courtesy of the Division of Wildlife Resource

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

BROWNE LAKE:  Fair

The lake is covered with ice. There haven't been any recent reports on fishing conditions, but other lakes in the area have good ice.

CALDER RESERVOIR:  Slow

The lake is covered with ice and a thin layer of snow.  The ice is now about 10 or more inches deep on February 10, so the cap seems to be holding up well. Anglers report slow fishing.  Carder has catch-and-release regulations.  You may use flies and lures only — bait is not allowed.  See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.

CROUSE RESERVOIR:  Slow

Water levels are extremely low.  Most of the remaining water has been pumped out to meet the water rights of downstream users.

EAST PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

Ice covers the reservoir, and we've only had one recent report of fair fishing.  The hasn't been any new information on access or ice conditions; however, lakes at a similar elevation have roughly 12 inches of good ice.  Check ice conditions carefully before venturing out.  The Uintas have been getting snow at higher elevations.

LONG PARK RESERVOIR:  Good

There haven't been any recent reports, but you'll likely find some ice. (Other reservoirs in the area have frozen.) Check ice conditions carefully before venturing out. Before the reservoir froze, anglers reported good fishing ushing small lures and baits near the inlet and boat ramp. 

MATT WARNER:  Good

There is still around 12 inces or ice, but there are signs that it is melting and refreezing at night. The roads are generally passable, especially in the morning when everything is frozen.  As the ice and snow thaw during the day, the roads can get muddy.  Please try to get out early so that the roads arn't damamged.  Try a mealworm or a piece of a nightcrawler from a bare hook or small jig.  Smaller, light-colored offerings seem to be working the best. 

MOOSE POND:  Fair

The pond is covered with ice, and anglers report fair to good fishing.  The pond was stocked with catchable-sized rainbows over the summer. 

SHEEP CREEK LAKE:  Slow

The lake should be covered with ice, but please check any ice carefully before venturing out.  There are not new fishing reports.  The roads in the area are closed for the winter.

SPIRIT LAKE:  Fair

The lake is covered with fishable ice.  You can access the lake by skis or snowmobiles, but the roads are closed.  Spirit Lake was restocked with catchable-sized tiger trout this summer.  Tamarak and Jessen were also stocked with tiger trout.  Two- to three-inch fingerlings were flown into thse upper lakes and they will take two or three years to reach catchable sizes.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE FLY SHOP!
(435) 889-3773 ext. 2

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1100 E Flaming Gorge Resort, Dutch John, UT 84023 | 435-889-3773 | info@flaminggorgeresort.com