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Fishing Reports

August 14, 2015

 

 

08-14-2015
 

Report and Pictures by Flaming Gorge Resorts Fishing Guide
David Schnieder


 

General Rating:  GOOD

General conditions: Fishing has been pretty tough.  The fish are feeding but they are being very picky about presentation and size.  I have been seeing a whole buffet of bugs throughout the day big and small.  Scuds have been in EVERY stomach sample that I have taken.  Recreational boaters are on the river almost every day.  Getting on the river earlier in the morning will help avoid a majority of the water fights and screaming.  Don't let that discourage you from coming to enjoy the river because there is plenty of fish to be caught.  The flows average 1700 cfs - 1900 cfs most of the day.  

Check the following BOR link for an updated daily measurement: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?09234500

Dry Flies:  FAIR-GOOD

Terrestrial's are starting to show up on the grass shore-lines.  Chernobyl ants have been getting quite a bit of eats.  I have been seeing Trico's, PMD's, Caddis, Flying Ants and Midges on the surface through the day.  Fish are willing to eat dry flies with good presentation's and a little patience.

Dry Fly Patterns: Green River Para Cricket, M's Hopper, Sailor Ant, Tan or Black PMX, Beetles, Hamburgler, Chernobyl Ants, Triple Double, Outrigger Caddis, Yellow Sallies, 409 black and brown, Peacock Caddis, Z-lon PMD, Lawson no hackle, Green Hopper, Swishers Para X-Cricket, Chernobyl ants black and brown.

Nymphs:  GOOD

Scuds, midge, caddis and mayfly nymphs are in the stomach samples I have taken.  Small scuds (#20-#26) have been my most eaten nymph.  The dead drift is critical and the strikes are very subtle so any hesitation on the indicator and I set the hook.  Fish are feeding at all depths and if you can get your flies presented right they will likely eat them.  Fluorocarbon leader and tippet will help your leader be invisible under the water.  Adjust your depth and weigth often in your drifting through feeding fish with no eats.

Nymph Patterns: Scuds, San Juan worms, Juju beatis/Jujube midge, Pheasant tail, Zebra midge, Rs-2, Gray soft hackle, Egan's Frenchie, Black Beauty, Ginger bugger, Split case PMD's, Turkey biot midges, iron sally, wd-50, prince nymph, and caddis emerger.

Streamers:  GOOD

Streamers/buggers have started to turn fish a little more often.  I have had good numbers of eats with a bugger dead drifted and a scud behind it.  I have seen sculpins and small fry swimming close to the banks.  We have thrown sculpins at the bank all day and idd fairly good but definately had to work for them.  Fish are active and willing to eat a streamer or sculpin pattern.

Streamers: Galloups Dragon black, tan and olive, Barely Legal, Sculpzilla natural and olive colors, Ginger bugger, Dali Llama, Rainbow trout fly, Space invador olive and black, Raghead sculpin, sleech.

Spin Fishing:  GOOD

Zig Jigs in black, tan and, olive. Rapala, fly and bubble, kast master, and spinners.

 Fishing with spin gear is always productive using Zig Jigs in black, tan and, olive. Brown Trout Rapalas are a good choice as well. Throwing a clear bubble with a Cicada a few feet away has also been working. Just remember if your using a trebble hook or if your lure has multiple trebble hooks its easier to release the fish and doesn’t harm them as much if you pinch the barbs down.

Other Information: 

We have raft and drift boat rentals as well as shuttles available to make your day a little easier.  Rods, reels, waders, boots and nets can be rented in the fly shop or station.  There is a lot of new gear in and osme great prices. Our fly shop hours are 6:30 A.M to 10:00 P.M please stop by or give us a call at 435-889-3773 Ext. 2. Tight lines!

DAVID'S WEEKLY PHOTOS

 

Report brought to you by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
by Ron Stewart, Northeastern Region Conservation Outreach Manager

 

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

Fishing has been good at Flaming Gorge.  The surface water temperature ranges from 70 degrees to 72 degrees.

Kokanee salmon: Fishing is still much slower than it was in June.  Larger three to four year old fish are now preparing to spawn.  The spawning kokanee will take on a new look - turning red and developing hooked noses - but they'll also migrate towards the spawning areas and stop foraging for food all together.  Last weekend, most of the fish were concentrated in small areas along the main channel in 45 to 60 feet of water and measured 12 to 14 inches in length.  Remember, mortality rates on released fish increase as water temperatures rise, so we encourage you to keep your limits of small kokanee.  If you're not harvesting, please us single, barbless hooks, minimize handling, and use nets with rubber coating.  A variety of lures are working well.  Try using pink, purple and orange colored lures, including dodger and squid combinations, #2 Needlefish, Rocky Mountain Tackle Viper spoons and Triple Teazers.  You should shorten the leader between the dodger and squid to about 10 inches.  Use orange colors during low light or cloudy periods.  if you're trolling, vary your speed between 1.6 and 2.0 mph.

Rainbow trout: Anglers are catching rainbows while trolling for kokanee or fishing deep water for bass.  If you're trolling, try using small spoons tipped with bait and moving at about 1.6 to 1.8 mph.  Most of the rainbow trout are in 40 to 60 feet of water in habitat ranging from main channel points to all the backs of canyons.  You can easily catch rainbows while casting towards shore with Marabou or tube jigs in earth tone colors.  If you fish in deeper water, you can catch both larger bass and rainbow trout.  Both species spend time in colder water looking for crayfish to eat.  Shore anglers can always catch rainbow trout by fishing with worms or Powerbait on the bottom.

Lake trout: Fishing is improving.  You can find schools of smaller lake trout along the main channel in 50 to 100 feet of water.  These smaller lake trout are numerous and aggressive at times, and they can be fun to catch and eat.  When you find a school, you have two options.  Option one:  drop a white tube jig or a jigging spoon (like a Northland Buckshot) tipped with a small chunk of sucker meat.  Be ready, though, the bites can be quick!  Option two:  troll small spoons or crankbaits immediately above the school at 1.4 to 1.8 mph using lures like Flatfish, Rapalas or wobble spoons (like Northland Forage Minnows) in silver or chartreuse.

Smallmouth bass:  The warmer water has sent larger bass into deeper waters, but anglers are still catching good numbers of smaller bass in the shallows.  Focus on using traditional smallmouth baits, like crawfish-pattern crankbaits or plastics.  Retrieving these and other baits (like single tail jigs) on or near the bottom should produce good results.

Burbot: Although there haven't been many reports, some anglers say the burbot fishing is good.  Burbot are most abundant in the uppermost reaches of the reservoir in Wyoming, so anglers should start their search there.  They are predominantly a nighttime fishery and prefer cooler water and rocky main channel structure.  Start fishing at dusk and target depths greater than 30 feet.  Use 3/8-1/2 ounce glow lures, like Yamamoto grubs in luminous white or Northland Buckshot spoons in glow, tipped with sucker or chub meat.  Burbot are not nearly as active or aggressive during the summer months, so jig lures slowly and close to the bottom, and move if you're not catching fish.  You'll help the Flaming Gorge fishery by  harvesting as many burbot as possible.  There is no limit on burbot.  

Report Information Courtesy of the Division of Wildlife Resource

 

Warnings: Several lakes in northeastern Utah may contain quagga and/or zebra mussels. Learn more about these destructive mussels and how to decontaminate your boat at http://wildlife.utah.gov/threats.html

Whirling disease was found in the northeastern region of the state. Please make sure you clean, dry and sterilize waders, livewells and other fishing gear before venturing to another water.

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another. 

BROWNE LAKE:  Fair

The water level is low for maintenance, but that is making it hard to launch a boat.  Fishing should be fiar to good for brook trout from the shore or a float tube.

CALDER RESERVOIR:  Fair

Anglers report fair fishing, and the water level remains low.  Calder has catch-and-release regulations. You must use flies and lures only; bait and scented or salted lures are not allowed. See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.

CROUSE RESERVOIR:  Slow

Water levels are extremely low.

EAST PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

Fishing has been slow to fair, but it varies greatly from one day to the next.  Try using trout baits (like worms or artificial baits), flies, brightly-colored spoons and crankbaits.  If you're bottom fishing, use something to float your bait about 18-24 inches off the bottom.  This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds so it's easier for the fish to find.  The water level is still high.

LONG PARK RESERVOIR:  Fair

Fishing is best duirng the morning and evening.  Try trolling deeper waters or drifting traditional trout baits.  You can still launch a boat.

MATT WARNER:  Good

Most reports are of fair to good fishing.  Try trout baits (like worms) or artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons and crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm about the mud and weeds where the fish will find it easier.

MOOSE POND:  Good

Anglers report good fishing, but it changes with the weather.  Try using worms, artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons or crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds and make it easier for the fish to find.  The ponds was recently stocked.

SHEEP CREEK LAKE:  Good

Fishing is good.  Anglers are catching nice-sized cutthroat trout using wet flies.  The best fishing is during the morning and evening.

SPIRIT LAKE:  Good

Anglers reported fair to good fishing.  For trout, try baits like worms, mealworms, salmon eggs or artificial baits, flies, brightly colored spoons, crayfish-colored jigs and fish-colored crankbaits.  When bottom fishing, use a marshmellow or floating bait to float your biat roughly 18-24 inches from the bottom.  This will keep your worm above the mud and weeks where the fish will find it easier.  Spirit was restocked with catchable-sized tiger trout last summer.  Tamarak and Jessen were also stocked with tiger trout.  Two to three inch fingerlings were flown into these upper lakes, and they will take about two to three years to reach catchable sizes.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE FLY SHOP!
(435) 889-3773 ext. 2

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