{{#each promoData}} {{/each}}

Flaming Gorge Resort offers the best options for Lodging and Accommodations around Flaming Gorge Reservoir.

We offer Green River Fly Fishing, Fly Fishing Guides, River Rafting and many more amazing summer and winter activities in the local area surrounding Dutch John, Utah.

 

Flaming Gorge Reservoir Current Status

(Last Updated: June 2, 2018)

Why has Reclamation increased flows from Flaming Gorge Dam?

As in the past, Reclamation is currently involved in the cooperative experimental Larval Trigger Study Plan (LTSP) which uses indicators of emergent endangered larval razorback sucker to “trigger” an increase in releases from Flaming Gorge Dam. 

The State of Utah - Division of Wildlife Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) confirmed the presence of larval razorback sucker in the middle Green River on Friday, May 18, 2018. As a result, Reclamation increased releases from Flaming Gorge Dam to power plant capacity (~4,600 cfs) beginning Tuesday, May 22, 2018 in an effort to entrain larvae in managed floodplains where they will have a better chance of survival.

The Flaming Gorge Technical Working Group (FGTWG), which is a multi-agency team of biologists and hydrologists responsible for making recommendations to Reclamation to assist in endangered species recovery efforts, submitted a request on Friday, May 25, 2018 for additional releases from Flaming Gorge Dam to aid in flood plain management operations and endangered species recovery.
In consideration of the May 25th FGTWG recommendation, the need to conserve water for other endangered species recovery concerns, and with understanding of concerns presented by downstream stakeholders affected by Flaming Gorge operations, Reclamation decided to implement a short duration spike flow beginning on Tuesday, May 29, 2018.

The Flaming Gorge Technical Working Group (FGTWG), which is a multi-agency team of biologists and hydrologists responsible for making recommendations to Reclamation to assist in endangered species recovery efforts, submitted a request on Friday, May 25, 2018 for additional releases from Flaming Gorge Dam to aid in flood plain management operations and endangered species recovery.

In consideration of the May 25th FGTWG recommendation, the need to conserve water for other endangered species recovery concerns, and with understanding of concerns presented by downstream stakeholders affected by Flaming Gorge operations, Reclamation decided to implement a short duration spike flow beginning on Tuesday, May 29, 2018.

How much water is Flaming Gorge going to release, and for how long?

Reclamation determines the flow rate to be released from Flaming Gorge Dam in part by considering how much flow that the unregulated Yampa River is expected to contribute to the middle Green River. The combination of flow from Flaming Gorge Dam and the Yampa River (along with other intermittent streams) must meet or exceed downstream flow targets through the middle Green River.

The Colorado River Basin Forecast Center (CBRFC) 10-day projection for the Yampa River at the Deerlodge gage (link: Yampa River at the Deerlodge gage) indicates that the Yampa River is continuing its gradual decline in flows from the peak which occurred on Sunday, May 13, 2018. The coming three days (May 29 – May 31, 2018) of projected flows in the Yampa River were identified as the last, best chance in the remaining runoff period, where supplemental flows from Flaming Gorge Dam could assist in floodplain related recovery efforts in the middle Green River.

The decision reached by Reclamation on Monday, May 28, 2018 was to increase flows from Flaming Gorge Dam to 6,600 cfs for 24 hours, followed by 1,000 cfs per day decrease, eventually returning to power plant capacity (~4,600 cfs) on Thursday, May 31, 2018. 

An apporoximation of flows in the middle Green River can be accessed from the CBRFC (link: Green River at Jensen, Utah). Please note that this projection includes the current release schedule from Flaming Gorge Dam, which may change over time.

Reclamation will be evaluating the appropriate level of releases from Flaming Gorge Dam on an ongoing basis to achieve the goals of the experimental program and targeted reservoir elevations. Presently, Reclamation is planning to gradually decrease releases from Flaming Gorge Dam, from power plant capacity (~4,600 cfs) to base flows (1,800 cfs) beginning June 1, 2018 and ending June 8, 2018.

The most current Flaming Gorge release schedule can be accessed through the following link: Current release schedule

General Yampa and Upper Green River basin hydrologies:

The Colorado River Basin Forecast Center (CBRFC) has published the May version of their runoff forecast for both Flaming Gorge Reservoir and the Yampa River. In the April through July period Flaming Gorge Reservoir is expected to receive 1,000,000 acre-feet (102% of average) while the Yampa River is expected to receive 841,000 acre-feet (66% of average), which is relatively dry compared to average. Flaming Gorge will be operating under the moderately dry hydrologic classification outlined in the 2005 Final Environmental Impact Statement.

Please refer to this site in the future for updates on Flaming Gorge operations, as they become available.

 

 

 

Book Your Adventure Now